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Terry Pratchett, Discworld’s Creator

We will miss Rincewind, Granny Ogg, the Wee Folks, Death and his granddaughter Susan, and all the other wonderful creations Terry Pratchett brought to the world.

Rest in peace and sympathy to his family and friends.

terry pratchett photo: Terry Pratchett terry.jpg

Terry Pratchett 1948 – 2015

Another Science Fiction Master Missing

 

Currently I’m reading/listening to Harry Harrison’s The Stainless Steel Rat’s Revenge. This is rip-roarin’ fun spies in space.

This morning I’ve learned Harrison has died. I was lucky enough to see him once at the LA Times Festival of Books a few years ago. He wrote a lot of good books, from fantastic space opera, to young adults invasions, to short stories, and everything in between in science fiction. Pull one of his books out and have fun.

Rest in Peace, Master Harrison.

Moment of Silence for Ray Bradbury

 

We’ve known he has been ill. Even so…

Thank you for Farenheit 451, and Something Wicked This Way Comes, and The Martian Chronicles, and…

Did You Grow Up With the Berenstain Bears?

 

We learned today that we’ve lost another great author – although we tend to forget her and her husband when we consider our favorite authors. I’ll admit I haven’t read any of their books in over 15 years.

Jan Berenstain died in Pennsylvania last week. My girls loved those books when they were little. I’m sure my granddaughters will soon be getting into them (the 6-year-old may already be reading them). The Berenstains wrote the books for over 50 years.

Thank you, Berenstains. You’ve left a legacy.

http://www.cnn.com/2012/02/27/us/berenstain-bears-author-dies/index.html?iref=allsearch

A Crying Dragon – Anne McCaffrey Has Died

 


If I could draw, I’d draw a crying dragon. I love McCaffrey’s books.

Rest in Peace, Lady of the Dragons (and Killashandra and singing ships and Peyteybee and Talents and Unicorn Girl and…)

Sad News

 


Brian Jacques, creator of the Redwall series, has died. These books are wonderful good vs bad children’s fantasies filled with woodland creatures set an at abbey run by mice.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-merseyside-12380763

J.D. Salinger

 

This hermit author died a few days ago. He had quite a cult following. His anti hero Holden Caufield is still admired by disaffected teens. I didn’t read any of Salinger’s books or short stories until I was in my 30’s. I didn’t get his work. I decided I wasn’t the target audience. I found his work esoteric and hard to appreciate for the most part. Occasionally I found a short story or two that I liked, but his work usually left me cold.

I had one irreverent thought when I head he had died – “How do they know? He hid away from everyone.” I guess I don’t understand hermits. One interview showed that Salinger continue to write long after he withdrew from the world. I wonder how long before this work will be published?

Arthur C. Clarke

 


Arthur C. Clarke died today – he was 90. He’s probably best known for 2001: A Space Odyssey, but he wrote so many books and articles. He wrote actual science fiction – the stuff based on scientific possibilities. My favorite of his is probably Rendezvous with Rama, but I enjoyed almost all of his science fiction work that I’ve read.

If you like Spider Robinson‘s Callahan’s Saloon, Clarke did it earlier in Tales from the White Hart. Then there’s the chilling Childhood’s End, one of his earliest (his first?) novels. Fountains of Paradise is based on an idea he first posited, then later had proved, about putting a station at the Earth’s equator so it would appear be never move because it orbited at the same speed as the Earth spun. Yet he didn’t stop writing. I understand he recently finished and proofed a novel he co-wrote with Frederik Pohl, The Last Theorem. It’s supposed to come out later this year. I bet it sells well.

Thanks, Mr. Clarke.