A Light in the Window by Jan Karon

 

General Fiction

A light in the window A Light In the WindowJan Karon; RiverOak 2005WorldCat

Father Timothy is a rector in the small North Carolina town of Mitford. He is just over 60 and is still a bachelor. He is busy with his church and congregation. He has just returned from a relaxing vacation in Ireland, his first vacation in 13 years. Now his attention returns to his lovely neighbor, Cynthia Coppersmith.

They had come to an understanding before he left. When he returns, Cynthia is distant to him although he’s not sure why. Meanwhile, a wealthy widow in his congregation has decided he should be her next husband. Father Tim wants no part of that! But Cynthia gets the impression he is interested in the widow. When Cynthia moves back to New York, Father Tim is very upset.

Miss Sadie, an elderly single woman in Father Tim’s congregation, has donated land and money to the church to build a new skilled nursing extended care center. The construction starts, disrupting Father Tim’s life even more. Then Meg Patrick showed up on his doorstep. She reminds him of the family gathering where they met in Ireland and that he extended to “visit anytime”. She moves in to the guest bedroom on the second floor to write her book about the Irish Americans descended from the immigrants of the potato famine.

Yet the enjoyable small town life of Mitford continues. Father Tim interacts with many people in the town, from the slightly (very?) crazy, to the daughter keeping her Alzheimer’s mother, the country hell-fire preacher, and Father Tim’s ward, Dooley.

A Light in the Window is a charming, non-suspenseful, cheerful book. It’s the second of the Mitford series. Jan Karon brings together the type of people found in any town, then ties them together with the neighborliness of a small town. Father Tim’s deep belief in God keeps him going through all sorts of situations, including challenging himself when he goofs up. I found myself tied in his and Cynthia’s relationship, grinning happily by the end of the novel.

More books by Jan Karon

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